Posts tagged obi

Sheep’s Foot

Is all made of iron, with an hammer head at one end to drive the ball nails into the ball stocks, and a claw at the other end, to draw the ball nails out of the ball stocks — M.
It is customary to have one for each press, which in a wooden press is suspended by the head from two nails driven into the near cheek of the press, just below the cap. It is a very useful article to the pressman; but is often applied instead of the mallet and shooting stick, to tighten or to loosen quoins, though it occasionally makes a batter by slipping; I do not like to see it used for this purpose.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday June 29 2014 — 14 notes

Throw

Both compositors and pressmen, when they gamble in the office, or take a chance for any advantage arising in work, generally throw for it; that is, they take nine em quadrats, usually English, and, shaking them well together in the hollow of both their hands, throw them upon the imposing stone, or press stone, and he who throws most nicks upward in three times is the winner. They choose quadrats with three deep nicks in each, when such a fount is in the office, as being most easily distinguished.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday June 15 2014 — 15 notes

Coffin

That part of a wooden press, in which the stone is bedded.

Type Founders usually send small quantities of sorts in brown paper made into a cone, and twisted at the small end, similar in shape to what grocers use for small articles; where there are no fount cases, or where they are full, compositors do the same with superfluous sorts; these conical papers are called Coffins.

The frame and bottom of a slice galley, into which the slice slides, is also called the coffin. See Galley.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday June 8 2014 — 20 notes

Its Own Paper

When one, two, three, or more copies of a sheet of a work, or a job, are printed on the paper that the whole is intended to be worked on, it is said to be Pulled on its own Paper. This is frequently done at the commencement of a work, when a proof of the first sheet is sent to the author, or bookseller, or both; that they may see the effect produced before it is proceeded with.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday May 25 2014 — 22 notes

Underlays

Pieces of paper pasted on the bottom of an engraving on wood, to raise it to the proper height to print with types, &c. If an engraving be hollow on the face of it, then a small underlay under the hollow part will raise that part by means of the pressure in printing it at press, and prevent the necessity of using too many overlays.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday May 11 2014 — 15 notes

Ruck

In printing at machines, the paper, particularly if it be soft and not flat, in travelling round the cylinders frequently wrinkles; this is termed Rucking, or the Paper Rucks, or the Paper is Rucked; when this takes place, the sheets may be looked on as spoiled when it is for book work: the best preventative is to press the wet paper well in a powerful press for an hour or two, with small quantities between the boards, just before it goes to the machine. I would not recommend more than five quires in each portion, although I am aware that a ream is generally put in; but the smaller the quantity between each two boards the flatter the paper will be, and less likely to ruck.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday May 4 2014 — 40 notes

Fudge

To execute work without the proper materials, and where the workman is obliged to substitute one article for another, and by contrivance make his work passable: when such cases occur, they show the skill and ingenuity of the compositor or pressman, in making his production look well.


From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday April 6 2014 — 41 notes

Shuffling

This is a term used in the Warehouse; and is part of the process of Knocking-up, when the paper is laid in heaps, after having been taken down from the poles, to make it lie even at the edges. It is performed by taking hold of a few quires of the paper loosely at the sides, and holding the far side a little lower than that next the body, upon the table, when, shaking both hands, it gradually projects the lower sheets; then lifting it up and bending it a little, it is let drop on its edge upon the table; by repeating this process two or three times, the parcel becomes even at the edges, and is in a fit state to be piled away. It is a process in which expertness can only be acquired by practice, and observation.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday March 30 2014 — 22 notes