Posts tagged obi

Fudge

To execute work without the proper materials, and where the workman is obliged to substitute one article for another, and by contrivance make his work passable: when such cases occur, they show the skill and ingenuity of the compositor or pressman, in making his production look well.


From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday April 6 2014 — 38 notes

Shuffling

This is a term used in the Warehouse; and is part of the process of Knocking-up, when the paper is laid in heaps, after having been taken down from the poles, to make it lie even at the edges. It is performed by taking hold of a few quires of the paper loosely at the sides, and holding the far side a little lower than that next the body, upon the table, when, shaking both hands, it gradually projects the lower sheets; then lifting it up and bending it a little, it is let drop on its edge upon the table; by repeating this process two or three times, the parcel becomes even at the edges, and is in a fit state to be piled away. It is a process in which expertness can only be acquired by practice, and observation.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday March 30 2014 — 22 notes

Qui

The established custom of the printing business in London is, for a workman when he intends to leave his situation to give a fortnight’s notice of his intention to quit; it is also the custom for the employer, when he finds it necessary to part with a workman, to give him a fortnight’s notice, except under particular circumstances of neglect or dishonesty, when the discharge is instanter: this is termed having got the Bullet; the fortnight’s notice to quit is termed having got the Qui. The word appears to be a contraction of Quietus [est], which, being granted to a sheriff, discharged him of all accounts due to the king. See Bullet.


From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday March 23 2014 — 45 notes

Clicker

The compositor who, in a companionship, receives the copy from the overseer or other person, gives it out to compose, receives the matter back when composed, keeps an account of what each person does, sets the head and direction lines, and the notes if any, makes up the pages, lays them down on the imposing stone, and makes out the account, apportioning to each his proper share; his own share of the bill being always equal with the highest: this refers to working on lines. In other companionships he receives the copy from the overseer, distributes it to his companions, and receives instructions how the work is to be done.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday March 16 2014 — 16 notes

Squabble

A page or form is squabbled when the letters of one or more lines are got into any of the adjacent lines; or that the letter or letters are twisted about out of their square position. — M.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday March 2 2014 — 30 notes

Fire Eater

Compositors who are expeditious workmen are styled Fire Eaters, and also Swifts.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday February 23 2014 — 13 notes

Pelt Pot

Generally a large jar, in which urine is kept, to steep the pelts in previous to making the balls; as also to steep the blankets in, in which the balls are wrapped up at night. This only refers to pelt balls, for where composition balls are used, this offensive article is discarded.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday February 16 2014 — 12 notes

Pigeon Holes

Wide whites between words, are by compositors (in way of scandal) called pigeon-holes, and are by none accounted good workmanship, unless in cases of necessity. — M. Cases of necessity do not make them good workmanship; and the only instances in which they are tolerated are when a page is small, and the type is large in proportion to it, and in columns of table work. In marginal notes they are avoided, by not of necessity spacing every line full out.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday February 9 2014 — 23 notes