Posts tagged obi

Fragments

After the body of a work and the index are composed, the title, preface, contents, &c. are proceeded with. If there be any pages beyond the concluding sheet, they are now imposed together to save presswork, and also warehouse work; and these pages are called Fragments.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Monday September 22 2014 — 18 notes

Paper Up Letter

To wrap the pages up in paper after a work is finished. — M.

In all book houses, there are bulks appropriated for the letter that is cleared away; so that when it is dry it may be papered up. In small houses this is generally done by the overseer; but in houses with large establishments, there is a person appointed to take care of the letter, furniture, chases, &c. which he keeps locked up, and delivers out as wanted: he also papers up the letter; that is, he wraps up each piece in the waste of some work, which he procures from the warehouse, and on which he writes the name of the type; it also tends to save trouble if he add whether it be open matter, Italic, or figures, as the case may be, as it prevents the necessity of opening the pieces out, when particular kinds only are wanted for distribution.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday September 14 2014 — 11 notes

Smout

Workmen when they are out of constant work, do sometimes accept of a day or two’s work, or a week’s work at another printing house: this by-work they call Smouting. — M.
In fact we only term it smouting when the business of a house is slack, or, in other words, when work is insufficient to employ fully the workmen regularly employed, and they go to some other house for temporary employment, till such time as there is sufficient for them in their own house, when they return.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday September 7 2014 — 26 notes

Shoe

An old shoe with the hind quarter cut away, hung upon a nail through the heel at the end of the imposing stone, into which to put bad letters when correcting. When full, the person who has the care of the materials empties it into the old metal box.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday August 31 2014 — 21 notes

Sheep’s Foot

Is all made of iron, with an hammer head at one end to drive the ball nails into the ball stocks, and a claw at the other end, to draw the ball nails out of the ball stocks — M.
It is customary to have one for each press, which in a wooden press is suspended by the head from two nails driven into the near cheek of the press, just below the cap. It is a very useful article to the pressman; but is often applied instead of the mallet and shooting stick, to tighten or to loosen quoins, though it occasionally makes a batter by slipping; I do not like to see it used for this purpose.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday June 29 2014 — 14 notes

Throw

Both compositors and pressmen, when they gamble in the office, or take a chance for any advantage arising in work, generally throw for it; that is, they take nine em quadrats, usually English, and, shaking them well together in the hollow of both their hands, throw them upon the imposing stone, or press stone, and he who throws most nicks upward in three times is the winner. They choose quadrats with three deep nicks in each, when such a fount is in the office, as being most easily distinguished.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday June 15 2014 — 15 notes

Coffin

That part of a wooden press, in which the stone is bedded.

Type Founders usually send small quantities of sorts in brown paper made into a cone, and twisted at the small end, similar in shape to what grocers use for small articles; where there are no fount cases, or where they are full, compositors do the same with superfluous sorts; these conical papers are called Coffins.

The frame and bottom of a slice galley, into which the slice slides, is also called the coffin. See Galley.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday June 8 2014 — 20 notes

Its Own Paper

When one, two, three, or more copies of a sheet of a work, or a job, are printed on the paper that the whole is intended to be worked on, it is said to be Pulled on its own Paper. This is frequently done at the commencement of a work, when a proof of the first sheet is sent to the author, or bookseller, or both; that they may see the effect produced before it is proceeded with.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday May 25 2014 — 22 notes