Posts tagged nonsense
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There was an old crazy perfumer,
Who took for his wife a young “bloomer;”
He wished a new scent, so, on roasting intent,
He said it would pay to consume her.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

There was an old crazy perfumer,
Who took for his wife a young “bloomer;”
He wished a new scent, so, on roasting intent,
He said it would pay to consume her.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, January 1, 2013
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There was an old miser who said, “why
Do you still importune me to buy?”
Because it’s so funny to handle your money,
That’s why we importune you to buy.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

There was an old miser who said, “why
Do you still importune me to buy?”
Because it’s so funny to handle your money,
That’s why we importune you to buy.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, December 31, 2012
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There was a prodigious young fop, dressed to kill from the foot to the top:
All the girls at the Fair could do nothing but stare
And keep clear of that killing young fop.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

There was a prodigious young fop, dressed to kill from the foot to the top:
All the girls at the Fair could do nothing but stare
And keep clear of that killing young fop.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, December 31, 2012
Permalink
There was a young lady who said
“I seldom wear hair on my head,
I carry my locks about in a box,
For such is the fashion,” she said.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

There was a young lady who said
“I seldom wear hair on my head,
I carry my locks about in a box,
For such is the fashion,” she said.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, December 31, 2012
Permalink
There was a young man of Lancaster,
Who walked ever faster and faster,
Till though he began by walking,
He ran and galloped all over Lancaster.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

There was a young man of Lancaster,
Who walked ever faster and faster,
Till though he began by walking,
He ran and galloped all over Lancaster.

From The new book of nonsense, published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, December 31, 2012
Permalink
A dandy came on from New York,
As pompous and stiff as a stork,
When he said “you don’t know how to get up a show,”
They just raffled the dandy from York.

From The new book of nonsense, Published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

A dandy came on from New York,
As pompous and stiff as a stork,
When he said “you don’t know how to get up a show,”
They just raffled the dandy from York.

From The new book of nonsense, Published by Ashmead & Evans, Philadelphia, 1864.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, December 31, 2012
Permalink
The worrying whizzing wasp,
Who stood on a table, and played sweetly on a 
Flute with a morning cap.

Edward Lear, from More nonsense, pictures, rhymes, botany, etc., London, 1872.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

The worrying whizzing wasp,
Who stood on a table, and played sweetly on a
Flute with a morning cap.

Edward Lear, from More nonsense, pictures, rhymes, botany, etc., London, 1872.

(Source: archive.org)

Thursday, October 4, 2012
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There was an old person of Skye,
Who waltz’d with a bluebottle fly:
They buzz’d a sweet tune, to the light of the moon,
And entranced all the people of Skye.

Edward Lear, from More nonsense, pictures, rhymes, botany, etc., London, 1872.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

There was an old person of Skye,
Who waltz’d with a bluebottle fly:
They buzz’d a sweet tune, to the light of the moon,
And entranced all the people of Skye.

Edward Lear, from More nonsense, pictures, rhymes, botany, etc., London, 1872.

(Source: archive.org)

Thursday, October 4, 2012