Posts tagged monster
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Therefore arise and dress thee, thou glutton.

Herbert Cole, from Fairy gold, by Ernest Rhys, London, New York, early 20th century (illustrations dated 1906, book reprinted in 1919, 1922…).

(Source: archive.org)

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Therefore arise and dress thee, thou glutton.

Herbert Cole, from Fairy gold, by Ernest Rhys, London, New York, early 20th century (illustrations dated 1906, book reprinted in 1919, 1922…).

(Source: archive.org)

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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The Lambton worm now became the terror of the whole country side.

Herbert Cole, from Fairy gold, by Ernest Rhys, London, New York, early 20th century (illustrations dated 1906, book reprinted in 1919, 1922…).

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

The Lambton worm now became the terror of the whole country side.

Herbert Cole, from Fairy gold, by Ernest Rhys, London, New York, early 20th century (illustrations dated 1906, book reprinted in 1919, 1922…).

(Source: archive.org)

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
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The fight with the snapping turtle.

Alfred Crowquill (Alfred Henry Forrester), from The book of ballads, edited by Bon Gaultier (William Edmonstoune Aytoun and Sir Theodore Martin), Edinburgh, London, 1870.

(Source: archive.org)

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The fight with the snapping turtle.

Alfred Crowquill (Alfred Henry Forrester), from The book of ballads, edited by Bon Gaultier (William Edmonstoune Aytoun and Sir Theodore Martin), Edinburgh, London, 1870.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 20, 2014
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Headpiece vignette to chapter IV: story of what the knight encountered in the woods.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

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Headpiece vignette to chapter IV: story of what the knight encountered in the woods.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 13, 2014
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To drop all formal parleying—And then you’re sure to catch it.

Peter Newell, from The hunting of the snark, by Lewis Carroll, New York, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

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To drop all formal parleying—And then you’re sure to catch it.

Peter Newell, from The hunting of the snark, by Lewis Carroll, New York, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
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In caverns by the water-side.

Peter Newell, from The hunting of the snark, by Lewis Carroll, New York, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

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In caverns by the water-side.

Peter Newell, from The hunting of the snark, by Lewis Carroll, New York, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
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The questing beast.

Arthur Rackham, from The romance of King Arthur, abridged from Malory’s Morte d’Arthur by Alfred W. Pollard, New York, 1920.

(Source: archive.org)

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The questing beast.

Arthur Rackham, from The romance of King Arthur, abridged from Malory’s Morte d’Arthur by Alfred W. Pollard, New York, 1920.

(Source: archive.org)

Thursday, July 17, 2014
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The Red Demon.

Christopher Whall W. Strang, from Beauty’s awakening, a masque of winter and of spring, by the  Art Workers Guild, London, 1899.

(Source: archive.org)

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The Red Demon.

Christopher Whall W. Strang, from Beauty’s awakening, a masque of winter and of spring, by the Art Workers Guild, London, 1899.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, July 15, 2014