Posts tagged eerie
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The banquet.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 2, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

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The banquet.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 2, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Shades, leaving the depth of their graves…

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

At the time this book was published, Baour-Lormian was an already aging author, considered as a classicist, to put things politely, by the rising generation. Devéria who was then a young and wild Romantic, cared very little for being associated with the old guard in any way, and he only accepted to do this set of illustrations on the condition that his name wouldn’t be mentioned anywhere.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

higher resolution

Shades, leaving the depth of their graves…

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

At the time this book was published, Baour-Lormian was an already aging author, considered as a classicist, to put things politely, by the rising generation. Devéria who was then a young and wild Romantic, cared very little for being associated with the old guard in any way, and he only accepted to do this set of illustrations on the condition that his name wouldn’t be mentioned anywhere.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

Monday, September 15, 2014
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She went to the farther end of the Allée des Alyscamps.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

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She went to the farther end of the Allée des Alyscamps.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
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But, hark ! — she stops — she listens — dreadful tone ! 
‘Tis her Tormentor’s laugh — and now a groan.

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by  Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

But, hark ! — she stops — she listens — dreadful tone !
‘Tis her Tormentor’s laugh — and now a groan.

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 6, 2014
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Scarce had she said 
These breathless words when a voice deep and dread 
As that of MONKER waking up the dead 
From their first sleep— so startling ‘twas to both— 
Rang thro’ the casement near, “Thy oath! thy oath!”

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by  Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

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Scarce had she said
These breathless words when a voice deep and dread
As that of MONKER waking up the dead
From their first sleep— so startling ‘twas to both—
Rang thro’ the casement near, “Thy oath! thy oath!”

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

Friday, September 5, 2014
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Guyon findes Mamon in a delve,
Sunning his threasure hore:
Is by him tempted, and led down,
To see his secrete store.

Walter Crane, from Spenser’s Faerie queene vol. 2, by Edmund Spenser,  London, 1895.

(Source: archive.org)

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Guyon findes Mamon in a delve,
Sunning his threasure hore:
Is by him tempted, and led down,
To see his secrete store.

Walter Crane, from Spenser’s Faerie queene vol. 2, by Edmund Spenser, London, 1895.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, May 27, 2014
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The dream.

Jean-Adolphe Beaucé, from Mathilde, followed by Les Mystères de Paris (The Mysteries of Paris), by Eugène Sue, Paris, 1850.

(Source: archive.org)

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The dream.

Jean-Adolphe Beaucé, from Mathilde, followed by Les Mystères de Paris (The Mysteries of Paris), by Eugène Sue, Paris, 1850.

(Source: archive.org)

Thursday, May 15, 2014
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Cabrion’s palette.

Jean-Adolphe Beaucé, from Mathilde, followed by Les Mystères de Paris (The Mysteries of Paris), by Eugène Sue, Paris, 1850.

(Source: archive.org)

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Cabrion’s palette.

Jean-Adolphe Beaucé, from Mathilde, followed by Les Mystères de Paris (The Mysteries of Paris), by Eugène Sue, Paris, 1850.

(Source: archive.org)

Thursday, May 15, 2014