Posts tagged death
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Thomas Edmund Harvey’s bookplate, by Cyril Goldie.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

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Thomas Edmund Harvey’s bookplate, by Cyril Goldie.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Friday, October 17, 2014
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Sir Launcelot is dust.

From The book of ballads, edited by Bon Gaultier (William Edmonstoune Aytoun and Sir Theodore Martin)  and illustrated by Alfred Crowquill (Alfred Henry Forrester), John Leech, Richard Doyle, Edinburgh, London, 1870.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

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Sir Launcelot is dust.

From The book of ballads, edited by Bon Gaultier (William Edmonstoune Aytoun and Sir Theodore Martin) and illustrated by Alfred Crowquill (Alfred Henry Forrester), John Leech, Richard Doyle, Edinburgh, London, 1870.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

Sunday, September 21, 2014
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With both hands his face he covered.

Harrison Fisher, from The song of Hiawatha, by  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,  Indianapolis, 1906.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

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With both hands his face he covered.

Harrison Fisher, from The song of Hiawatha, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Indianapolis, 1906.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

Friday, September 19, 2014
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First a speck, and then a vulture.

Harrison Fisher, from The song of Hiawatha, by  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,  Indianapolis, 1906.

(Source: archive.org)

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First a speck, and then a vulture.

Harrison Fisher, from The song of Hiawatha, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Indianapolis, 1906.

(Source: archive.org)

Friday, September 19, 2014
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The flood.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 2, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

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The flood.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 2, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
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The banquet.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 2, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

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The banquet.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 2, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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The pilgrim.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

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The pilgrim.

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
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Shades, leaving the depth of their graves…

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

At the time this book was published, Baour-Lormian was an already aging author, considered as a classicist, to put things politely, by the rising generation. Devéria who was then a young and wild Romantic, cared very little for being associated with the old guard in any way, and he only accepted to do this set of illustrations on the condition that his name wouldn’t be mentioned anywhere.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

higher resolution

Shades, leaving the depth of their graves…

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

At the time this book was published, Baour-Lormian was an already aging author, considered as a classicist, to put things politely, by the rising generation. Devéria who was then a young and wild Romantic, cared very little for being associated with the old guard in any way, and he only accepted to do this set of illustrations on the condition that his name wouldn’t be mentioned anywhere.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

Monday, September 15, 2014