Permalink
So engrossed was the butcher, he heeded them not.

Peter Newell, from The hunting of the snark, by Lewis Carroll, New York, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

So engrossed was the butcher, he heeded them not.

Peter Newell, from The hunting of the snark, by Lewis Carroll, New York, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
Permalink
He could be seen […] erect and melancholy on his horse.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

He could be seen […] erect and melancholy on his horse.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
Permalink
You could say that a sharp, threatening flame shot from her eyes.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

You could say that a sharp, threatening flame shot from her eyes.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
Permalink
She went to the farther end of the Allée des Alyscamps.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

She went to the farther end of the Allée des Alyscamps.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
Permalink
He wound his right arm around Livette’s waist.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

He wound his right arm around Livette’s waist.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, September 8, 2014
Permalink
He saw naught but the woman, young, fair, unclothed.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

He saw naught but the woman, young, fair, unclothed.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, September 8, 2014
Permalink
… Thick, curly hair, surmounted by a tinsel crown.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

… Thick, curly hair, surmounted by a tinsel crown.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, September 8, 2014

Smout

Workmen when they are out of constant work, do sometimes accept of a day or two’s work, or a week’s work at another printing house: this by-work they call Smouting. — M.
In fact we only term it smouting when the business of a house is slack, or, in other words, when work is insufficient to employ fully the workmen regularly employed, and they go to some other house for temporary employment, till such time as there is sufficient for them in their own house, when they return.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday September 7 2014 — 26 notes