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He saw naught but the woman, young, fair, unclothed.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

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He saw naught but the woman, young, fair, unclothed.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, September 8, 2014
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… Thick, curly hair, surmounted by a tinsel crown.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard,  Philadelphia, circa 1901. 

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

… Thick, curly hair, surmounted by a tinsel crown.

Georges Roux, from King of Camargue, by Jean Aicard, Philadelphia, circa 1901.

(Source: archive.org)

Monday, September 8, 2014

Smout

Workmen when they are out of constant work, do sometimes accept of a day or two’s work, or a week’s work at another printing house: this by-work they call Smouting. — M.
In fact we only term it smouting when the business of a house is slack, or, in other words, when work is insufficient to employ fully the workmen regularly employed, and they go to some other house for temporary employment, till such time as there is sufficient for them in their own house, when they return.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday September 7 2014 — 26 notes
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No sooner was the flowery crown 
Plac’d on her head than sleep came down, 
Gently as nights of summer fall, 
Upon the lids of NOURMAHAL.

Philip Francis Stephanoff, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by  Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.


(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

No sooner was the flowery crown
Plac’d on her head than sleep came down,
Gently as nights of summer fall,
Upon the lids of NOURMAHAL.

Philip Francis Stephanoff, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.


(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 6, 2014
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And watch, and look along the deep. 
For him whose smiles first made her weep.

Philip Francis Stephanoff, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by  Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

And watch, and look along the deep.
For him whose smiles first made her weep.

Philip Francis Stephanoff, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 6, 2014
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Fiercely he broke away, nor stopp’d, 
Nor look’d — but from the lattice dropp’d 
Down ‘mid the pointed crags beneath, 
As if he fled from love to death.

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by  Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

Fiercely he broke away, nor stopp’d,
Nor look’d — but from the lattice dropp’d
Down ‘mid the pointed crags beneath,
As if he fled from love to death.

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 6, 2014
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But, hark ! — she stops — she listens — dreadful tone ! 
‘Tis her Tormentor’s laugh — and now a groan.

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by  Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

But, hark ! — she stops — she listens — dreadful tone !
‘Tis her Tormentor’s laugh — and now a groan.

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 6, 2014
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Scarce had she said 
These breathless words when a voice deep and dread 
As that of MONKER waking up the dead 
From their first sleep— so startling ‘twas to both— 
Rang thro’ the casement near, “Thy oath! thy oath!”

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by  Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

Scarce had she said
These breathless words when a voice deep and dread
As that of MONKER waking up the dead
From their first sleep— so startling ‘twas to both—
Rang thro’ the casement near, “Thy oath! thy oath!”

Edward Corbould, from Lalla Rookh, an oriental romance, by Thomas Moore, London, 1853.

(Source: archive.org)

Friday, September 5, 2014