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Shades, leaving the depth of their graves…

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

At the time this book was published, Baour-Lormian was an already aging author, considered as a classicist, to put things politely, by the rising generation. Devéria who was then a young and wild Romantic, cared very little for being associated with the old guard in any way, and he only accepted to do this set of illustrations on the condition that his name wouldn’t be mentioned anywhere.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

higher resolution

Shades, leaving the depth of their graves…

Achille Devéria, from Légendes ballades et fabliaux vol. 1, by Pierre-Marie-François Baour-Lormian, Paris, 1829.

At the time this book was published, Baour-Lormian was an already aging author, considered as a classicist, to put things politely, by the rising generation. Devéria who was then a young and wild Romantic, cared very little for being associated with the old guard in any way, and he only accepted to do this set of illustrations on the condition that his name wouldn’t be mentioned anywhere.

(Source: Bayerische Staatsbibliothek)

Monday, September 15, 2014

Paper Up Letter

To wrap the pages up in paper after a work is finished. — M.

In all book houses, there are bulks appropriated for the letter that is cleared away; so that when it is dry it may be papered up. In small houses this is generally done by the overseer; but in houses with large establishments, there is a person appointed to take care of the letter, furniture, chases, &c. which he keeps locked up, and delivers out as wanted: he also papers up the letter; that is, he wraps up each piece in the waste of some work, which he procures from the warehouse, and on which he writes the name of the type; it also tends to save trouble if he add whether it be open matter, Italic, or figures, as the case may be, as it prevents the necessity of opening the pieces out, when particular kinds only are wanted for distribution.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday September 14 2014 — 11 notes
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Speaking thus, she vanished over the side of the vessel.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

Speaking thus, she vanished over the side of the vessel.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

Sunday, September 14, 2014
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A fourth traveler had joined them, unobserved.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

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A fourth traveler had joined them, unobserved.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

Sunday, September 14, 2014
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Headpiece vignette to chapter VIII: The day after the wedding.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

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Headpiece vignette to chapter VIII: The day after the wedding.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 13, 2014
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Headpiece vignette to chapter IV: story of what the knight encountered in the woods.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

Headpiece vignette to chapter IV: story of what the knight encountered in the woods.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 13, 2014
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He perceived Undine, smiling and happy.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

He perceived Undine, smiling and happy.

Frances Bassett Comstock, from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 13, 2014
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Front cover from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, illustrated by  Frances Bassett Comstock, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

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Front cover from Undine : a legend, by Friedrich de la Motte-Fouqué, illustrated by Frances Bassett Comstock, New York, 1911.

(Source: archive.org)

Saturday, September 13, 2014