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France — Brittany.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

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France — Brittany.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

Wednesday, July 2, 2014
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Female costume of Normandy.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

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Female costume of Normandy.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
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France, 19th century — traditional costumes from Nivernais, Dauphiné, former county of Nice, Mâconnais, Bresse and Bourbonnais.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

higher resolution

France, 19th century — traditional costumes from Nivernais, Dauphiné, former county of Nice, Mâconnais, Bresse and Bourbonnais.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
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France, 18th-19th century — shawls.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

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France, 18th-19th century — shawls.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, July 1, 2014
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France, 18th century — Headdress and bodice. 

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

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France, 18th century — Headdress and bodice.

Auguste Racinet, from Le costume historique (The costume history) vol. 6, Paris, 1888.

(Source: archive.org)

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Sheep’s Foot

Is all made of iron, with an hammer head at one end to drive the ball nails into the ball stocks, and a claw at the other end, to draw the ball nails out of the ball stocks — M.
It is customary to have one for each press, which in a wooden press is suspended by the head from two nails driven into the near cheek of the press, just below the cap. It is a very useful article to the pressman; but is often applied instead of the mallet and shooting stick, to tighten or to loosen quoins, though it occasionally makes a batter by slipping; I do not like to see it used for this purpose.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday June 29 2014 — 14 notes
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I was preoccupied, fair Isoline, with powerful ideas.

J-J. Grandville, from Vie privée et publique des animaux (Public and Private Life of Animals), under the direction of P. J. Stahl, Paris, 1867.

(Source: archive.org)

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I was preoccupied, fair Isoline, with powerful ideas.

J-J. Grandville, from Vie privée et publique des animaux (Public and Private Life of Animals), under the direction of P. J. Stahl, Paris, 1867.

(Source: archive.org)

Sunday, June 29, 2014
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The swallow’s second letter.

J-J. Grandville, from Vie privée et publique des animaux (Public and Private Life of Animals), under the direction of P. J. Stahl, Paris, 1867.

(Source: archive.org)

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The swallow’s second letter.

J-J. Grandville, from Vie privée et publique des animaux (Public and Private Life of Animals), under the direction of P. J. Stahl, Paris, 1867.

(Source: archive.org)

Sunday, June 29, 2014