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And ere they could stop her she had turned her palfrey’s head towards the prison window, and pushed her white arms through the bars to clasp the prince.

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

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And ere they could stop her she had turned her palfrey’s head towards the prison window, and pushed her white arms through the bars to clasp the prince.

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

Tuesday, March 25, 2014
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“‘Tis their daughter, Princess Joan,” said the wizard with a sigh. “But do not look at her, my son, for she will bring nothing but trouble to all who know her.”

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

higher resolution

“‘Tis their daughter, Princess Joan,” said the wizard with a sigh. “But do not look at her, my son, for she will bring nothing but trouble to all who know her.”

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

Tuesday, March 25, 2014
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One by one the villagers came out of their cottages and gathered around them to listen.

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

higher resolution

One by one the villagers came out of their cottages and gathered around them to listen.

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

Monday, March 24, 2014
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Then he picked up the necklace on the point of his sword and carried it, slung thereon, unto the council chamber. 

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

higher resolution

Then he picked up the necklace on the point of his sword and carried it, slung thereon, unto the council chamber.

Walter Crane, from The necklace of Princess Fiorimonde and other stories , by Mary De Morgan, London, 1886.

(Source: archive.org.)

Monday, March 24, 2014

Qui

The established custom of the printing business in London is, for a workman when he intends to leave his situation to give a fortnight’s notice of his intention to quit; it is also the custom for the employer, when he finds it necessary to part with a workman, to give him a fortnight’s notice, except under particular circumstances of neglect or dishonesty, when the discharge is instanter: this is termed having got the Bullet; the fortnight’s notice to quit is termed having got the Qui. The word appears to be a contraction of Quietus [est], which, being granted to a sheriff, discharged him of all accounts due to the king. See Bullet.


From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Sunday March 23 2014 — 45 notes
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Parks with oak and chestnut shady,
Parks and order’d gardens great.
(The Lord of Burleigh)

From Landscape illustrations to the poems of Alfred lord Tennyson, Boston, 1892.

(Source: archive.org.)

higher resolution

Parks with oak and chestnut shady,
Parks and order’d gardens great.
(The Lord of Burleigh)

From Landscape illustrations to the poems of Alfred lord Tennyson, Boston, 1892.

(Source: archive.org.)

Saturday, March 22, 2014
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From the ruin’d shrine he stept 
And in the moon athwart the place of tombs
Came on the shining levels of the lake.

From Landscape illustrations to the poems of Alfred lord Tennyson, Boston, 1892.

(Source: archive.org.)

higher resolution

From the ruin’d shrine he stept
And in the moon athwart the place of tombs
Came on the shining levels of the lake.

From Landscape illustrations to the poems of Alfred lord Tennyson, Boston, 1892.

(Source: archive.org.)

Saturday, March 22, 2014
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The wind is roaring in turret and tree.
(The Sisters)

From Landscape illustrations to the poems of Alfred lord Tennyson, Boston, 1892.

(Source: archive.org.)

higher resolution

The wind is roaring in turret and tree.
(The Sisters)

From Landscape illustrations to the poems of Alfred lord Tennyson, Boston, 1892.

(Source: archive.org.)

Saturday, March 22, 2014