OBI Scrapbook Blog

Oct 19

Wool Hole

A place boxed off sometimes under a stair case, or in any situation where the dust will not affect the press room, or other departments of the business — in which the wool is carded wherewith to make the balls.

The wool is kept in the box, over which two pieces of wood are stretched across and fastened down, lowest in the front; on these one of the cards is fixed. In the act of carding the wool the dust and refuse fall into the box, and are thus prevented from being trampled about.

Wool Hole. The workhouse. When a compositor or pressman is reduced by age or illness to take refuge in the workhouse, it is said he is in the Wool Hole.

From A Dictionary of the Art of Printing, by William Savage, London, 1841.

Léon Gambetta’s bookplate, by Alphonse Legros.
(“He who wants, can.”)

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link. 

(Source: archive.org)

Léon Gambetta’s bookplate, by Alphonse Legros.
(“He who wants, can.”)

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

A zip file containing the six illustrations of the latest series can be downloaded at this link.

(Source: archive.org)

W. L. Busse’s bookplate, by Paul Voigt.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

W. L. Busse’s bookplate, by Paul Voigt.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Oct 18

F. Raisin’s bookplate, by Evert van Muyden.(“Ils sont trop verts !” is from the fable The Fox and the Grapes by La Fontaine, and intended as a pun on the name Raisin - grapes in English)

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

F. Raisin’s bookplate, by Evert van Muyden.
(“Ils sont trop verts !” is from the fable The Fox and the Grapes by La Fontaine, and intended as a pun on the name Raisin - grapes in English)

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Arthur Guthrie’s bookplate, by Henry Ospovat.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Arthur Guthrie’s bookplate, by Henry Ospovat.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Oct 17

Comte de Gramont’s bookplate, by Robert Anning Bell.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Comte de Gramont’s bookplate, by Robert Anning Bell.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Phil May’s bookplate, by W. P. Nicholson.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Phil May’s bookplate, by W. P. Nicholson.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Thomas Edmund Harvey’s bookplate, by Cyril Goldie.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)

Thomas Edmund Harvey’s bookplate, by Cyril Goldie.

From Modern book-plates and their designers, winter number of The Studio, London, 1898.

(Source: archive.org)